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Posts Tagged ‘HDR’

It was time for a truly authentic bamboo raft experience on the Yulong River, which is a tributary of the Li River in  Yangshuo. These rafts are smaller and only take two people plus a helmsman who guides  you down the river using a long bamboo pole. It was sold as a romantic tour with no engines or big ferry boats to disturb you but in China the biggest challenge is simply the number of people so it’s rare to ever have something all to yourself. That having being said it was beautiful and there was some excitement as you go over these 3-4 foot weirs on rafts that certainly haven’t been designed with that in mind. Our guide actually fell off the raft twice going over said weirs. The first time I felt sorry for him but after the second time I concluded that he just wasn’t very good.

all the rafts at the Chaoyang Dock starting point

beautiful calm water and scenery HDR

approaching the first weir

getting closer

going over the weir

and splash! (this was the point I realised having my camera out wasn't such a good idea)

one of the many floating restaurants you pass

some of the other boats having water fights with lots of screaming

looking back at other rafts going over a weir

The money shot - we are oblivious, our guide in the water & the people behind in shock

our guide fell off on this one too

bamboo forests on a narrower section of the river

getting a little crowded

Despite the crowds, restaurants and souvenir photo stations after every weir (which actually got a priceless shot of our guide falling off) it was a nice way to spend 2 hours with some more beautiful views of the Karst peaks beside the river and a little excitement going over the weirs.

We had actually hired mountain bikes to get to the Chaoyang Dock and they arrange for your bikes to be driven to the end of the cruise. They weren’t the most comfortable though, or perhaps I hadn’t been on a bike for a long time, so after riding back into town for lunch we decided to chill out that afternoon and enjoyed some Scrabble games on the deck at the hostel while sipping on some delicious honey-banana milkshakes.

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Or at least something that looked like a bamboo raft. They are actually made from PVC tubing but they look similar. We got collected from our hostel at 10:00am and taken by bus to Yangdi Pier. Along the way the tour guide who spoke reasonable English gave us some info on the area and the things of interest to look out for during the cruise on the river. We lucked out and got the front seat on our raft which was 1 of 6 in our group. It was nice to be on the water, despite being the middle of the day a breeze kept us cool and the scenery was just what I expected and hoped for.

Our flotilla leaving Yangdi Pier

Lots of rafts up ahead approaching the first bend

Interesting peak all on its own HDR

enjoying our front row seat

sheer rock face beside the Li River

and then the sun came out HDR panorama

The famous section seen on the Chinese 20 Yuan bank-note

short pit stop at riverside curio sellers

supposedly you can see 9 horses in the side of this peak, I'm not so sure

a Cormorant on a stick

Water Buffalo in the water

"You get the view and I'll get you."

One of the large cruise boats that don't look very nice

Two Karst peaks watching over the Li River HDR

cruising in style on a raft down the Li River

The bamboo raft cruise from Yangdi Pier to Xingping (where another bus took us to Yangshuo) lasted about 2 hours and was one of the highlights of my trip.

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These photos are all the end result of combining several photos together. I am not going to show you the before photos and if you want to know more about process you can look at my earlier post on HDRI. Still new to this type of photography I made some mistakes but here are a few of the ones that I thought came out pretty well and I hade fun creating. Enjoy!

NB Click on the images to enlarge

Sunset and vapour trail over Guilin HDR

Guilin & Solitary Beauty Peak viewed from Fubo Hill HDR

The Li River at the exit of the Crown Cave HDR

Elephant Trunk Hill landmark in Guilin HDR

Looking through the Elephant Trunk up the Li River HDR

Margaurita & I at dusk in front of Elephant Trunk Hill

Sunset behind the Sun & Moon Pagodas HDR

Margaurita & I at sunset on the roof of Ming Palace Hostel HDR

OK, the last one is a bit over-processed. I discovered that taking HDR images with people is difficult but I’m having lots of fun experimenting with this process. Most of these were taken hand-held without a tripod and I’m still learning how to tweak the various settings. However these photos make the normal photos look so boring it makes me want to take HDR all the time and I hopefully my photos will improve even more as my technique improves.

 

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As you have seen in recent posts I’m really enjoying my new camera and lens. Just when I thought photography couldn’t get any better I was browsing the web and discovered HDRI which stands for High Dynamic Range Imaging. This is what Wikipedia has on the subject:

high dynamic range imaging (HDRI or just HDR) is a set of techniques that allow a greater dynamic range of luminance between the lightest and darkest areas of an image than current standard digital imaging techniques or photographic methods. This wide dynamic range allows HDR images to more accurately represent the range of intensity levels found in real scenes, ranging from direct sunlight to faint starlight.

Some of the images examples I’ve seen are amazing so I did some more research and thought I would try it for myself. In short, our eyes can adjust to different intensity levels while a camera takes a still image at a single exposure setting. With HDR images you take several images at different exposure value (EV) settings and then merge them together. With my Canon 550D it as an auto exposure bracketing (AEB) setting which means it automatically takes 3 exposures when I press the shutter release. It takes a normal optimal exposure (EV 0), then a dark exposure (EV -2) and then a bright exposure (EV +2).

An underexposed image taken at EV -2

A normal exposure taken at EV 0

An overexposed image taken at EV +2

Next you merge the 3 images together, I used Photoshop, and then you can adjust various settings like exposure, gamma, radius, shadows, detail, strength, vibrancy and saturation. I wasn’t sure about this as some images look over-processed and no longer realistic but I think the concept of using this technique to achieve an image with detail closer to what the human eye can detect is exciting. So without playing with the settings too much and just working on increasing the detail in the shadow and highlight areas I got the following final image.

Final HDR image

I know this isn’t the best use or example of HDR but for a first attempt I’m fairly pleases and really excited to experiment more with this technique so look out for more HDR images in the future.

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